Welcome to season 2 of our DRC Sound Design Tutorials series, where we resume our voyage of discovery through the sea of synthesis. Our first port of call is a track which takes the listener on a journey, with a variety of sections forming waypoints as the piece evolves. Captain of this week’s ship is Copenhagen based, Danish music producer ‘Trentemøller’ with the track ‘Prana’ from his 2006 debut album ‘The Last Resort’.

In Hindu philosophy, ‘prana’ means ‘vital principle’ or ‘life force’, a spiritual interpretation and understanding of all cosmic energy in the entire universe. This influence is clear from the very start of the track, sitars paint a picture of sun and sand dunes, instantly invoking an Asian flavour. A bouncing bass soon breaks free of the trance like state and provides an injection of momentum to propel the piece forwards, pulling at the listeners curiosity, the journey begins.

As increasingly interesting elements appear over the horizon and into our ears, the sitar leaves a slow trail of footprints in the sand, a continuous reminder of the path previously tread, which ultimately ends the same way that it started.

Trentemøller’s musical talent was encouraged from an early age, starting with the piano at just 5 years old. At 11 he wrote the music for a school drama production, and by 14 was playing keyboards and drums in several indie, rock and blues bands. Just like DRC, he is a testament to versatility, which has led to remix work for the likes of Moby, Depeche Mode and Pet Shop Boys.

Hopefully this new season of videos inspires you to take a creative journey of your own - be sure to let us know if it does!

Click here to download the Ableton Live project

We love great Danes,
Team Imaginando

latest news

How to make The Chemical Brothers 'Wide Open' synth and keys sounds in DRC...

Published on 12 Oct 2018

In 2015 The Chemical Brothers released their 8th studio album ‘Born in the Echoes’ with several tracks featuring guest vocals from a diverse selection of artists. The English duo defied common collaboration conventions however, by omitting the artist credit in each case. Whilst the pitched up vocal on the album’s second single ‘Go’ is not too difficult to identify as Q-Tip (having previously worked together on the 2004 hit single ‘Galvanize’) the singer of the album’s closing track ‘Wide open’ can be a little trickier to place.The artist in question is of course Beck, who was eventually named as a featured artist when The Chemical Brothers released the beautiful and visually stunning music video ‘Wide Open Ft. Beck’ in January 2016. Featuring a solo dance choreographed by Wayne McGregor and performed by Sonoya Mizuno, the cutting edge CGI effects are made even more impressive by the use of one, long, continuous shot - a single take, no edits.The Chemical Brothers have a bit of a passion for creating interesting and unique videos for their tracks, working with directorial partnership Dom & Nic for other tracks such as ‘Believe’ and ‘The Salmon Dance’, and teaming up with Michel Gondry for the subtly synced audio visuals of ‘Star Guitar.’Making another audio and visual appearance in our video this week is DLYM Delay Modulator - our free effects plugin. Click here to find out more and download your copy of DLYM!Click here to download the Ableton project file.Beck with another one of those block rockin’ beats,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and laser sounds from Todd Terje 'Inspector Norse' in DRC...

Published on 8 Oct 2018

Of the many sub-genres of electronic dance music, it’s probably fair to say that ‘Norwegian disco’ (also known as ‘space disco’ or even ‘cosmic disco’) is a style that is not yet familiar to the masses. If asked to name several popular types of dance music, we don’t think regular disco would be anywhere near the top of list, let alone Norwegian disco.In the cold of the Arctic circle, Norway has historically been somewhat culturally cut off from outside influences, which in part has led to the steady rise of its home grown party scene and soundtrack. As chronicled in the fantastic 2017 documentary ‘Northern Disco Lights’ (highly recommended - well worth a watch!) one of the country’s driving forces of this kind of music is Terje Olsen, better known as the artist Todd Terje.A long time collaborator with fellow Norwegian producer Lindstrøm, the use of Todd Terje as his chosen artist name is a nod to prolific American house DJ Todd Terry. A playfulness that carries over into Terje’s work, he doesn’t take himself too seriously, describing his aim to make his music ‘fruity’ by injecting personality and a silly sense of humour into his tracks.In this week’s video we take on his big breakthrough hit ‘Inspector Norse’, by covering the tune’s bass sound and laser sound with DRC.Click here to download the Ableton project fileThere’s Norway back for us now,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and arpeggio sounds from Kavinsky 'Nightcall' in DRC...

Published on 28 Sep 2018

Whilst some artists are content with purely having music be their artform, Vincent Belorgey is not one of them. If that name is unfamiliar to you, it’s because he is more commonly known as ‘Kavinsky.’ More than just a stage name, it’s a whole character, complete with a backstory carved out of the science fiction and zombie movies of the 80’s.The influence of 80’s culture is recognisable in all of Kavinsky’s creative facets; the retro styling of the music videos, the oldskool action film narratives contained within, and of course the glorious sound of classic synthesizers creating an atmosphere of pure nostalgia.The premise of the Kavinsky character’s history is certainly interesting; in 1986 he crashes his red Ferrari Testarossa, (the same car as the 80’s arcade racing game ‘Out Run’) he then reappears 20 years later as an electronic music creating zombie. Nightcall tells the story of Kavinsky’s quest to find his girlfriend at the time of the crash, only to discover that she has already moved on from him.Originally released in 2010, the track received a boost of mainstream exposure and popularity after it was used in the opening sequence of the 2011 movie ‘Drive.’ In 2013, the English group ‘London Grammar’ took the song in a totally different direction, featuring haunting piano and vocals, their cover version almost feels like a completely different song.If you haven’t already, be sure to check out our free effects plugin DLYM Delay Modulator that we used in this week’s video - it could be that extra little bit of sonic seasoning you are looking for!Click here to download the Ableton project fileWe’ll go all night long,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and lead sounds from 'Nova' by Tale Of Us with DRC...

Published on 21 Sep 2018

Have we mentioned before how much we love techno? Having featured several of our own favourite artists from the genre, this week’s tutorial track is actually another viewer suggestion, one we were happy to oblige and indulge our ears in the process. The track in question is ‘Nova’ by Tale Of Us, the DJ and producer partnership of Carmine ‘Karm’ Conte & Matteo Milleri.Since their debut release ‘Dark Song’ back in 2011, Tale Of Us have not only been releasing a steady stream of underground hits, but also creating and building their now huge ‘Afterlife’ brand, with Ibiza residencies and of course the Afterlife Recordings label.Residing in the techno rich club scene of Berlin, the duo describe their sound as being filled with ‘emotion and drama’, saying ‘We don't make Berlin techno and we never will, because we're Italian.’Recently, the pair were immortalised in videogame form, appearing in the massively successful Grand Theft Auto Online, as part of the nightclub based expansion ‘After hours’. Inside a selection of virtual nightclubs, players can enjoy a full DJ set featuring brand new remixes and productions, created especially for the game.If you are an Ableton user, you won’t want to miss this week’s free project file too - it has all of the automation and track routings for you to check out and explore.If you enjoy any of the DRC Sound Design Tutorial videos, be sure to let us know in the comments, and feel free to ‘smash that like button!’Click here to download the Ableton Live projectLike a champagne supernova,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and laser sounds from Todd Terje 'Inspector Norse' in DRC...

Published on 8 Oct 2018

Of the many sub-genres of electronic dance music, it’s probably fair to say that ‘Norwegian disco’ (also known as ‘space disco’ or even ‘cosmic disco’) is a style that is not yet familiar to the masses. If asked to name several popular types of dance music, we don’t think regular disco would be anywhere near the top of list, let alone Norwegian disco.In the cold of the Arctic circle, Norway has historically been somewhat culturally cut off from outside influences, which in part has led to the steady rise of its home grown party scene and soundtrack. As chronicled in the fantastic 2017 documentary ‘Northern Disco Lights’ (highly recommended - well worth a watch!) one of the country’s driving forces of this kind of music is Terje Olsen, better known as the artist Todd Terje.A long time collaborator with fellow Norwegian producer Lindstrøm, the use of Todd Terje as his chosen artist name is a nod to prolific American house DJ Todd Terry. A playfulness that carries over into Terje’s work, he doesn’t take himself too seriously, describing his aim to make his music ‘fruity’ by injecting personality and a silly sense of humour into his tracks.In this week’s video we take on his big breakthrough hit ‘Inspector Norse’, by covering the tune’s bass sound and laser sound with DRC.Click here to download the Ableton project fileThere’s Norway back for us now,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and arpeggio sounds from Kavinsky 'Nightcall' in DRC...

Published on 28 Sep 2018

Whilst some artists are content with purely having music be their artform, Vincent Belorgey is not one of them. If that name is unfamiliar to you, it’s because he is more commonly known as ‘Kavinsky.’ More than just a stage name, it’s a whole character, complete with a backstory carved out of the science fiction and zombie movies of the 80’s.The influence of 80’s culture is recognisable in all of Kavinsky’s creative facets; the retro styling of the music videos, the oldskool action film narratives contained within, and of course the glorious sound of classic synthesizers creating an atmosphere of pure nostalgia.The premise of the Kavinsky character’s history is certainly interesting; in 1986 he crashes his red Ferrari Testarossa, (the same car as the 80’s arcade racing game ‘Out Run’) he then reappears 20 years later as an electronic music creating zombie. Nightcall tells the story of Kavinsky’s quest to find his girlfriend at the time of the crash, only to discover that she has already moved on from him.Originally released in 2010, the track received a boost of mainstream exposure and popularity after it was used in the opening sequence of the 2011 movie ‘Drive.’ In 2013, the English group ‘London Grammar’ took the song in a totally different direction, featuring haunting piano and vocals, their cover version almost feels like a completely different song.If you haven’t already, be sure to check out our free effects plugin DLYM Delay Modulator that we used in this week’s video - it could be that extra little bit of sonic seasoning you are looking for!Click here to download the Ableton project fileWe’ll go all night long,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and lead sounds from 'Nova' by Tale Of Us with DRC...

Published on 21 Sep 2018

Have we mentioned before how much we love techno? Having featured several of our own favourite artists from the genre, this week’s tutorial track is actually another viewer suggestion, one we were happy to oblige and indulge our ears in the process. The track in question is ‘Nova’ by Tale Of Us, the DJ and producer partnership of Carmine ‘Karm’ Conte & Matteo Milleri.Since their debut release ‘Dark Song’ back in 2011, Tale Of Us have not only been releasing a steady stream of underground hits, but also creating and building their now huge ‘Afterlife’ brand, with Ibiza residencies and of course the Afterlife Recordings label.Residing in the techno rich club scene of Berlin, the duo describe their sound as being filled with ‘emotion and drama’, saying ‘We don't make Berlin techno and we never will, because we're Italian.’Recently, the pair were immortalised in videogame form, appearing in the massively successful Grand Theft Auto Online, as part of the nightclub based expansion ‘After hours’. Inside a selection of virtual nightclubs, players can enjoy a full DJ set featuring brand new remixes and productions, created especially for the game.If you are an Ableton user, you won’t want to miss this week’s free project file too - it has all of the automation and track routings for you to check out and explore.If you enjoy any of the DRC Sound Design Tutorial videos, be sure to let us know in the comments, and feel free to ‘smash that like button!’Click here to download the Ableton Live projectLike a champagne supernova,Team Imaginando...

How to make The Chemical Brothers 'Wide Open' synth and keys sounds in DRC...

Published on 12 Oct 2018

In 2015 The Chemical Brothers released their 8th studio album ‘Born in the Echoes’ with several tracks featuring guest vocals from a diverse selection of artists. The English duo defied common collaboration conventions however, by omitting the artist credit in each case. Whilst the pitched up vocal on the album’s second single ‘Go’ is not too difficult to identify as Q-Tip (having previously worked together on the 2004 hit single ‘Galvanize’) the singer of the album’s closing track ‘Wide open’ can be a little trickier to place.The artist in question is of course Beck, who was eventually named as a featured artist when The Chemical Brothers released the beautiful and visually stunning music video ‘Wide Open Ft. Beck’ in January 2016. Featuring a solo dance choreographed by Wayne McGregor and performed by Sonoya Mizuno, the cutting edge CGI effects are made even more impressive by the use of one, long, continuous shot - a single take, no edits.The Chemical Brothers have a bit of a passion for creating interesting and unique videos for their tracks, working with directorial partnership Dom & Nic for other tracks such as ‘Believe’ and ‘The Salmon Dance’, and teaming up with Michel Gondry for the subtly synced audio visuals of ‘Star Guitar.’Making another audio and visual appearance in our video this week is DLYM Delay Modulator - our free effects plugin. Click here to find out more and download your copy of DLYM!Click here to download the Ableton project file.Beck with another one of those block rockin’ beats,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and laser sounds from Todd Terje 'Inspector Norse' in DRC...

Published on 8 Oct 2018

Of the many sub-genres of electronic dance music, it’s probably fair to say that ‘Norwegian disco’ (also known as ‘space disco’ or even ‘cosmic disco’) is a style that is not yet familiar to the masses. If asked to name several popular types of dance music, we don’t think regular disco would be anywhere near the top of list, let alone Norwegian disco.In the cold of the Arctic circle, Norway has historically been somewhat culturally cut off from outside influences, which in part has led to the steady rise of its home grown party scene and soundtrack. As chronicled in the fantastic 2017 documentary ‘Northern Disco Lights’ (highly recommended - well worth a watch!) one of the country’s driving forces of this kind of music is Terje Olsen, better known as the artist Todd Terje.A long time collaborator with fellow Norwegian producer Lindstrøm, the use of Todd Terje as his chosen artist name is a nod to prolific American house DJ Todd Terry. A playfulness that carries over into Terje’s work, he doesn’t take himself too seriously, describing his aim to make his music ‘fruity’ by injecting personality and a silly sense of humour into his tracks.In this week’s video we take on his big breakthrough hit ‘Inspector Norse’, by covering the tune’s bass sound and laser sound with DRC.Click here to download the Ableton project fileThere’s Norway back for us now,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and arpeggio sounds from Kavinsky 'Nightcall' in DRC...

Published on 28 Sep 2018

Whilst some artists are content with purely having music be their artform, Vincent Belorgey is not one of them. If that name is unfamiliar to you, it’s because he is more commonly known as ‘Kavinsky.’ More than just a stage name, it’s a whole character, complete with a backstory carved out of the science fiction and zombie movies of the 80’s.The influence of 80’s culture is recognisable in all of Kavinsky’s creative facets; the retro styling of the music videos, the oldskool action film narratives contained within, and of course the glorious sound of classic synthesizers creating an atmosphere of pure nostalgia.The premise of the Kavinsky character’s history is certainly interesting; in 1986 he crashes his red Ferrari Testarossa, (the same car as the 80’s arcade racing game ‘Out Run’) he then reappears 20 years later as an electronic music creating zombie. Nightcall tells the story of Kavinsky’s quest to find his girlfriend at the time of the crash, only to discover that she has already moved on from him.Originally released in 2010, the track received a boost of mainstream exposure and popularity after it was used in the opening sequence of the 2011 movie ‘Drive.’ In 2013, the English group ‘London Grammar’ took the song in a totally different direction, featuring haunting piano and vocals, their cover version almost feels like a completely different song.If you haven’t already, be sure to check out our free effects plugin DLYM Delay Modulator that we used in this week’s video - it could be that extra little bit of sonic seasoning you are looking for!Click here to download the Ableton project fileWe’ll go all night long,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and lead sounds from 'Nova' by Tale Of Us with DRC...

Published on 21 Sep 2018

Have we mentioned before how much we love techno? Having featured several of our own favourite artists from the genre, this week’s tutorial track is actually another viewer suggestion, one we were happy to oblige and indulge our ears in the process. The track in question is ‘Nova’ by Tale Of Us, the DJ and producer partnership of Carmine ‘Karm’ Conte & Matteo Milleri.Since their debut release ‘Dark Song’ back in 2011, Tale Of Us have not only been releasing a steady stream of underground hits, but also creating and building their now huge ‘Afterlife’ brand, with Ibiza residencies and of course the Afterlife Recordings label.Residing in the techno rich club scene of Berlin, the duo describe their sound as being filled with ‘emotion and drama’, saying ‘We don't make Berlin techno and we never will, because we're Italian.’Recently, the pair were immortalised in videogame form, appearing in the massively successful Grand Theft Auto Online, as part of the nightclub based expansion ‘After hours’. Inside a selection of virtual nightclubs, players can enjoy a full DJ set featuring brand new remixes and productions, created especially for the game.If you are an Ableton user, you won’t want to miss this week’s free project file too - it has all of the automation and track routings for you to check out and explore.If you enjoy any of the DRC Sound Design Tutorial videos, be sure to let us know in the comments, and feel free to ‘smash that like button!’Click here to download the Ableton Live projectLike a champagne supernova,Team Imaginando...

How to make The Chemical Brothers 'Wide Open' synth and keys sounds in DRC...

Published on 12 Oct 2018

In 2015 The Chemical Brothers released their 8th studio album ‘Born in the Echoes’ with several tracks featuring guest vocals from a diverse selection of artists. The English duo defied common collaboration conventions however, by omitting the artist credit in each case. Whilst the pitched up vocal on the album’s second single ‘Go’ is not too difficult to identify as Q-Tip (having previously worked together on the 2004 hit single ‘Galvanize’) the singer of the album’s closing track ‘Wide open’ can be a little trickier to place.The artist in question is of course Beck, who was eventually named as a featured artist when The Chemical Brothers released the beautiful and visually stunning music video ‘Wide Open Ft. Beck’ in January 2016. Featuring a solo dance choreographed by Wayne McGregor and performed by Sonoya Mizuno, the cutting edge CGI effects are made even more impressive by the use of one, long, continuous shot - a single take, no edits.The Chemical Brothers have a bit of a passion for creating interesting and unique videos for their tracks, working with directorial partnership Dom & Nic for other tracks such as ‘Believe’ and ‘The Salmon Dance’, and teaming up with Michel Gondry for the subtly synced audio visuals of ‘Star Guitar.’Making another audio and visual appearance in our video this week is DLYM Delay Modulator - our free effects plugin. Click here to find out more and download your copy of DLYM!Click here to download the Ableton project file.Beck with another one of those block rockin’ beats,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and laser sounds from Todd Terje 'Inspector Norse' in DRC...

Published on 8 Oct 2018

Of the many sub-genres of electronic dance music, it’s probably fair to say that ‘Norwegian disco’ (also known as ‘space disco’ or even ‘cosmic disco’) is a style that is not yet familiar to the masses. If asked to name several popular types of dance music, we don’t think regular disco would be anywhere near the top of list, let alone Norwegian disco.In the cold of the Arctic circle, Norway has historically been somewhat culturally cut off from outside influences, which in part has led to the steady rise of its home grown party scene and soundtrack. As chronicled in the fantastic 2017 documentary ‘Northern Disco Lights’ (highly recommended - well worth a watch!) one of the country’s driving forces of this kind of music is Terje Olsen, better known as the artist Todd Terje.A long time collaborator with fellow Norwegian producer Lindstrøm, the use of Todd Terje as his chosen artist name is a nod to prolific American house DJ Todd Terry. A playfulness that carries over into Terje’s work, he doesn’t take himself too seriously, describing his aim to make his music ‘fruity’ by injecting personality and a silly sense of humour into his tracks.In this week’s video we take on his big breakthrough hit ‘Inspector Norse’, by covering the tune’s bass sound and laser sound with DRC.Click here to download the Ableton project fileThere’s Norway back for us now,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass and arpeggio sounds from Kavinsky 'Nightcall' in DRC...

Published on 28 Sep 2018

Whilst some artists are content with purely having music be their artform, Vincent Belorgey is not one of them. If that name is unfamiliar to you, it’s because he is more commonly known as ‘Kavinsky.’ More than just a stage name, it’s a whole character, complete with a backstory carved out of the science fiction and zombie movies of the 80’s.The influence of 80’s culture is recognisable in all of Kavinsky’s creative facets; the retro styling of the music videos, the oldskool action film narratives contained within, and of course the glorious sound of classic synthesizers creating an atmosphere of pure nostalgia.The premise of the Kavinsky character’s history is certainly interesting; in 1986 he crashes his red Ferrari Testarossa, (the same car as the 80’s arcade racing game ‘Out Run’) he then reappears 20 years later as an electronic music creating zombie. Nightcall tells the story of Kavinsky’s quest to find his girlfriend at the time of the crash, only to discover that she has already moved on from him.Originally released in 2010, the track received a boost of mainstream exposure and popularity after it was used in the opening sequence of the 2011 movie ‘Drive.’ In 2013, the English group ‘London Grammar’ took the song in a totally different direction, featuring haunting piano and vocals, their cover version almost feels like a completely different song.If you haven’t already, be sure to check out our free effects plugin DLYM Delay Modulator that we used in this week’s video - it could be that extra little bit of sonic seasoning you are looking for!Click here to download the Ableton project fileWe’ll go all night long,Team Imaginando...