‘Time flies when you’re having fun’ - almost a year in fact, as we rapidly approach what feels like a milestone number of videos posted to our YouTube DRC tutorial playlist - 50!

Having featured some classic synth sounds going back several decades, today’s track is easily one of the ‘youngest’, as it was released just under 2 years ago, in march of 2016.

We’re not quite sure how Germany manages to inspire so many great techno producers, but we’re certainly not complaining, and we have another master of melodic moodiness for you again this week: ‘Recondite’ with his track ‘Warg’.

It’s another of our ‘double patch’ tutorials too, so you’ll learn how to create both the bass sound and the lead synth as well.

Recondite is Berlin based producer Lorenz Brunner, an Ableton advocate, fan of Live’s ‘colourless’ built in effects and a self confessed lover of ‘Operator’, proclaiming ‘It’s the only synth I need.’

Whilst we think every studio has a place for DRC, this idea really resonates with us; pushing instruments/creative tools to their limits and exploring all the possibilities.

Something that we’ve endeavored to demonstrate across the course of the last 47 videos, is the power of truly mastering a versatile synth like DRC, and reaping the sonical rewards that such knowledge brings.

We certainly have fun making them and we love reading the feedback in the comments, so thank you to everyone who has got in touch, liked and subscribed!

The ‘tech’ behind the techno,
Team Imaginando

latest news

How to make the bass from SBTRKT 'Wildfire' in DRC...

Published on 10 Dec 2018

Throughout the history of dance music the concept of anonymity has played many different roles. Back in the glory days of vinyl, to prevent others from discovering their killer tracks, some DJ’s hid the identity of the records they were playing, by covering up the artist and track name with stickers. Anonymity is also one of the most powerful tools for defense and protection in the ‘free party’ scene, more commonly known as illegal raves. Producers themselves can also use the power of anonymity to try new directions in music, by releasing experimental material under a fake name, or pseudonym, in case it isn’t well received by their usual audience.Whilst English DJ and producer SBTRKT doesn’t deny the last example, his spin on the reason for attempting to stay anonymous goes a little deeper into his mindset and work ethic. This ties into the artist name too, with SBTRKT being a reference to subtracting himself from his music, to ‘let the music speak for itself’.When performing, SBTRKT wears native ceremonial inspired masks, which come from the designer and artist ‘A Hidden Place’ who also prides themselves on being anonymous. At Bestival in 2011, cardboard recreations of one mask were handed out to the crowd - a spectacular and novel visual for a DJ to look out on!This week we take an in-depth look at the hot bass line sound from SBTRKT’s 2011 track ‘Wildfire’Click here to download the Ableton project fileThere’s no vowels in our product names either,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass, keys and lead for Gui Boratto - 'Take My Breath Away'...

Published on 3 Dec 2018

This week we’re attempting to sonically take your breath away, with our DRC sound design tutorial for Gui Boratto’s 2009 smash ‘Take My Breath Away’.Born in São Paulo, Brazil, in 1974, Gui Boratto released his critically acclaimed debut album ‘Chromophobia’ in 2007 on well established german label Kompakt. Featuring tight production skills, driving rhythms and a clear love of melody, it’s easy to attribute such fine technical craftsmanship to Boratto’s many years working as a studio engineer for some of the biggest record labels worldwide.Fast forward to June of this year, Boratto proudly released his 5th studio album on Kompakt, whilst seeking out talent to put out on his very own D.O.C brand imprint, (conveniently distributed by Kompakt!) which he created in 2013.As evident in Gui’s final productions, he is inspired by the whole spectrum of life’s emotions and feelings, to create a diverse range of moods. Speaking about the creative process behind his 2018 album Pentagram he explains ‘It’s good to be happy, but also good to be sad, fragile or strong’.Aside from his own original production work, Gui has also had a steady stream of remix work for a suitably diverse selection of artists, including Pet Shop Boys, London Grammar and even made an appearance on the Halo 4 OST remix album. (Yes that is a real thing and no, we had no idea either!)Click here to download the Ableton project fileExhale, exhale, exhale…Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass from SBTRKT 'Wildfire' in DRC...

Published on 10 Dec 2018

Throughout the history of dance music the concept of anonymity has played many different roles. Back in the glory days of vinyl, to prevent others from discovering their killer tracks, some DJ’s hid the identity of the records they were playing, by covering up the artist and track name with stickers. Anonymity is also one of the most powerful tools for defense and protection in the ‘free party’ scene, more commonly known as illegal raves. Producers themselves can also use the power of anonymity to try new directions in music, by releasing experimental material under a fake name, or pseudonym, in case it isn’t well received by their usual audience.Whilst English DJ and producer SBTRKT doesn’t deny the last example, his spin on the reason for attempting to stay anonymous goes a little deeper into his mindset and work ethic. This ties into the artist name too, with SBTRKT being a reference to subtracting himself from his music, to ‘let the music speak for itself’.When performing, SBTRKT wears native ceremonial inspired masks, which come from the designer and artist ‘A Hidden Place’ who also prides themselves on being anonymous. At Bestival in 2011, cardboard recreations of one mask were handed out to the crowd - a spectacular and novel visual for a DJ to look out on!This week we take an in-depth look at the hot bass line sound from SBTRKT’s 2011 track ‘Wildfire’Click here to download the Ableton project fileThere’s no vowels in our product names either,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass, keys and lead for Gui Boratto - 'Take My Breath Away'...

Published on 3 Dec 2018

This week we’re attempting to sonically take your breath away, with our DRC sound design tutorial for Gui Boratto’s 2009 smash ‘Take My Breath Away’.Born in São Paulo, Brazil, in 1974, Gui Boratto released his critically acclaimed debut album ‘Chromophobia’ in 2007 on well established german label Kompakt. Featuring tight production skills, driving rhythms and a clear love of melody, it’s easy to attribute such fine technical craftsmanship to Boratto’s many years working as a studio engineer for some of the biggest record labels worldwide.Fast forward to June of this year, Boratto proudly released his 5th studio album on Kompakt, whilst seeking out talent to put out on his very own D.O.C brand imprint, (conveniently distributed by Kompakt!) which he created in 2013.As evident in Gui’s final productions, he is inspired by the whole spectrum of life’s emotions and feelings, to create a diverse range of moods. Speaking about the creative process behind his 2018 album Pentagram he explains ‘It’s good to be happy, but also good to be sad, fragile or strong’.Aside from his own original production work, Gui has also had a steady stream of remix work for a suitably diverse selection of artists, including Pet Shop Boys, London Grammar and even made an appearance on the Halo 4 OST remix album. (Yes that is a real thing and no, we had no idea either!)Click here to download the Ableton project fileExhale, exhale, exhale…Team Imaginando...