To a lot of people, Ibiza is the spiritual home of clubbing, the combination of sun, sea and super-star DJ’s, pull in thousands of partying punters every year. With most of the big opening parties already done, the summer season on the white isle is now in full swing.

Up until 2016 another ‘S’ which dominated the Ibiza scene was the super-club ‘Space’ with its iconic outdoor terrace, an open-air dancefloor, playing host to many huge house acts over the years. One such artist is Cuban-American DJ and producer Eric Estornel, more commonly known by his stage name ‘Maceo Plex’.

A long-time regular at many Ibiza clubs, Maceo Plex’s blend of deep house, tech house and techno provides an effortlessly cool sexy style, a perfect fit for the trendy, discerning party-goer. (Much like DRC’s cool, sexy style, makes it an excellent choice for perspicacious producers!)

In today’s DRC sound design tutorial, we take on Maceo Plex’s 2011 release ‘Ain’t That Love’ - a record we think is a great way to get into the party mood. After a couple of weeks of gorgeous but moody techno, this one is sure to give a hot, soulful start to your summer celebration season, wherever you are.

Click here to download the Ableton Live project

Here’s to a super sonic summer,
Team Imaginando

latest news

How to make the arpeggio sound for Nils Frahm 'Says' in DRC...

Published on 15 Feb 2019

So much of electronic music is dominated by the kick drum. It commands control of a club with its pumping pulse, a bass fueled metronome for the crowd to coordinate their dance moves. Depending on your workflow, (and genre of course) it might very well be the first note you lay down for every single track you create, and ultimately influence the development of the piece thereafter.This week for our DRC Sound Design Tutorial however, we’re delving into a different side of electronic music, breaking free from the restraints of dance/club oriented records and into the beautiful world of modern classical/contemporary.The concept of mixing symphonies and synthesizers dates back to the birth of some of the machines themselves; a notable example being Wendy Carlos’ iconic soundtrack for the 1971 film ‘A Clockwork Orange’ featuring some very haunting versions of Purcell, Rossini and Beethoven within.Our focus today is on original compositions though, specifically the 2013 track ‘Says’ by German musician, composer and producer Nils Frahm. A classically trained pianist with a love of vintage synths, drum machines and effects units, his performances see him surrounded by the likes of Roland and Moog.To create the arpeggio sound from the track with its modulated movements and ambient delay, in addition to DRC we also use our free effects plugin ‘DLYM Delay Modulator’ which you can 'download here'.In the video Lucas plays the notes for the arpeggio part live, but you don’t need to of course, just grab the free Ableton Live session from the link below!Click here to download the Ableton project fileLovers of both classical and techno,Team Imaginando...

How to make the bass sound from Justice Vs Simian 'We Are Your Friends' in DRC...

Published on 8 Feb 2019

The art of remixing is a powerful one. Through a kind of creative iteration by collaboration, it is possible to produce something which completely eclipses the original recording in terms of popularity, exposure and success. A prime example of this is the 2006 house classic ‘We Are Your Friends’ from ‘Justice Vs Simian’; where the French DJ duo remixed the track ‘Never Be Alone’ by English rock band ‘Simian’.From the very first beat of the Justice edit, we’re hit with the instantly recognisable, iconic organ stabs, then just a few bars later we get launched straight into that funky bassline. It’s a solid, relentless intro which immediately grabs your attention and draws you in. Justice strip away the song’s indie/rock roots, taking its catchy chorus and injecting their trademark pumping, electro-house style, to totally transform the energy of the track.At the 2006 MTV Europe Music Awards, ‘We Are Your Friends’ won the award for ‘Best Music Video’, much to the disbelief of Kanye West, who immediately stormed the stage to voice his astonishment and disappointment of failing to win the award himself.In 2015 the track’s anthemic title was immortalised in Hollywood, with a film release of the same name, featuring Zac Efron as the lead. An attempt to cash in on the sudden rise of EDM culture at the time, it received mixed reviews, but we’re sure both Justice and Simian enjoyed the royalties nonetheless!This week we show you how to recreate the bass sound for yourself, using DRC.Click here to download the Ableton project fileBecause we are your friends,Team Imaginando...

How to make the arpeggio sound for Nils Frahm 'Says' in DRC...

Published on 15 Feb 2019

So much of electronic music is dominated by the kick drum. It commands control of a club with its pumping pulse, a bass fueled metronome for the crowd to coordinate their dance moves. Depending on your workflow, (and genre of course) it might very well be the first note you lay down for every single track you create, and ultimately influence the development of the piece thereafter.This week for our DRC Sound Design Tutorial however, we’re delving into a different side of electronic music, breaking free from the restraints of dance/club oriented records and into the beautiful world of modern classical/contemporary.The concept of mixing symphonies and synthesizers dates back to the birth of some of the machines themselves; a notable example being Wendy Carlos’ iconic soundtrack for the 1971 film ‘A Clockwork Orange’ featuring some very haunting versions of Purcell, Rossini and Beethoven within.Our focus today is on original compositions though, specifically the 2013 track ‘Says’ by German musician, composer and producer Nils Frahm. A classically trained pianist with a love of vintage synths, drum machines and effects units, his performances see him surrounded by the likes of Roland and Moog.To create the arpeggio sound from the track with its modulated movements and ambient delay, in addition to DRC we also use our free effects plugin ‘DLYM Delay Modulator’ which you can 'download here'.In the video Lucas plays the notes for the arpeggio part live, but you don’t need to of course, just grab the free Ableton Live session from the link below!Click here to download the Ableton project fileLovers of both classical and techno,Team Imaginando...