“Choose life. Choose a job. Choose a family…” - From the explosive opening scene to the ending epilogue, the 1996 film ‘Trainspotting’ featured an eclectic soundtrack which helped create some of the movie’s most memorable moments.

As well as Iggy Pop’s ‘Lust for life’, another track now synonymous with the film, is the classic ‘Born Slippy’ by Underworld, or to be more precise ‘Born Slippy .NUXX’.

Underworld did produce a track called ‘Born Slippy’ in 1995, but the two tracks are completely different in terms of content and style. (‘Born Slippy .NUXX’ was actually the B-side on the initial single)

Written and produced by Rick Smith, Karl Hyde and Darren Emerson, the strange and confusing lyrics are an interpretation of the thoughts of an alcoholic mind. The band have since confirmed that Karl was indeed an alcoholic himself, around the time the track was created.

After Trainspotting was released, public interest in ‘Born Slippy .NUXX’ soared, and as a result it was released as a single in July 1996, peaking at number 2 in the UK singles chart.

The reason for the rather odd track name can be split into two parts: ‘Born Slippy’ was the name of a racing greyhound which the band reportedly placed a winning bet on. The addition of ‘.NUXX’ has been attributed to a computer glitch the band were experiencing at the time, where project files were somehow given a file extension suffix of ‘.NUXX’.

If you’re recreating this sound for yourself and you don’t see the ‘Flutter’ control in DRC, simply upgrade to the latest version and it will appear.

Mega-mega white thing…
Team Imaginando

latest news

How to make Trentemøller 'Prana' bass and stab sounds in DRC...

Published on 18 May 2018

Welcome to season 2 of our DRC Sound Design Tutorials series, where we resume our voyage of discovery through the sea of synthesis. Our first port of call is a track which takes the listener on a journey, with a variety of sections forming waypoints as the piece evolves. Captain of this week’s ship is Copenhagen based, Danish music producer ‘Trentemøller’ with the track ‘Prana’ from his 2006 debut album ‘The Last Resort’.In Hindu philosophy, ‘prana’ means ‘vital principle’ or ‘life force’, a spiritual interpretation and understanding of all cosmic energy in the entire universe. This influence is clear from the very start of the track, sitars paint a picture of sun and sand dunes, instantly invoking an Asian flavour. A bouncing bass soon breaks free of the trance like state and provides an injection of momentum to propel the piece forwards, pulling at the listeners curiosity, the journey begins.As increasingly interesting elements appear over the horizon and into our ears, the sitar leaves a slow trail of footprints in the sand, a continuous reminder of the path previously tread, which ultimately ends the same way that it started.Trentemøller’s musical talent was encouraged from an early age, starting with the piano at just 5 years old. At 11 he wrote the music for a school drama production, and by 14 was playing keyboards and drums in several indie, rock and blues bands. Just like DRC, he is a testament to versatility, which has led to remix work for the likes of Moby, Depeche Mode and Pet Shop Boys.Hopefully this new season of videos inspires you to take a creative journey of your own - be sure to let us know if it does!Click here to download the Ableton Live projectWe love great Danes,Team Imaginando...

How ETIC Algarve is using DRC in music production courses...

Published on 4 Apr 2018

We are proud to announce that we recently formed an educational partnership with a local creative industries technological college/school here in Portugal: ETIC Algarve.Enthusiastic to see DRC involved in a teaching environment, we were keen to hear the thoughts of ETIC Algarve, ahead of this exciting collaboration. With a backdrop of the fantastic facilities available at the college, we asked the teaching staff about their decision to work with us, and DRC, in the classroom:Can you tell us a bit about your school/college, and the courses/services you offer to students?ETIC Algarve is a technical and vocational school, specializing in the creative industries Design, Photography, Video, Videogames, Web & Communication and of course Sound & Music. There is a strong emphasis on practice over theory inside a space of invention and restlessness where we promote the constant quest for discovery, where creativity and innovation go hand in hand. We promote a way of teaching based on real work practices, with real clients, real projects and real deadlines, all of them closely followed by our teachers who are professionals in the creative industries. We are training not only students, but more importantly our future co-workers.Can you tell us the reasons for choosing to include DRC as part of your teaching?Rafael Correia, one of ETIC Algarve’s trainers, covers this one: Firstly, because I use DRC in my personal projects and I like it. As a VST, it's very versatile and we [teachers] believe it's clear, useful and very quick to get some good results. And that's good for this kind of course.Which key features of DRC do you think will be especially useful to your students and really add value to their learning experience?The clear interface and easy access to the main functions; It has the main structure/architecture required to understand the basis of synthesis, but also [has the ability] to go further and get to unique places using DRC, almost intuitively. Waveforms, Oscillators, Noise, Modulation, Filter, Mixer, Portamento - we can easily use all these concepts to explain synthesis and the work of almost every VST, with a great interface.Which areas of study/which topics are you planning to teach using DRC?Analogic + Digital synthesis theory, Oscillators, Modulation, Poly/monophony, Glide, different kinds of filters, LFOs.How important is it for you to partner with customer focused companies like Imaginando?It's good to work with such good software, and a great team, in the same country! It works very well and gives the students a real close notion of this subject. The direct support from the company is very important, and shows how interested Imaginando are in this partnership with ETIC Algarve and our students, this gives us confidence and the feeling of being close to the product and its development.If you are an educational institution and you’d like to see how Imaginando could benefit your students, please get in touch and we will be happy to discuss how we could work together.From Portugal with passion,Team Imaginando...

How ETIC Algarve is using DRC in music production courses...

Published on 4 Apr 2018

We are proud to announce that we recently formed an educational partnership with a local creative industries technological college/school here in Portugal: ETIC Algarve.Enthusiastic to see DRC involved in a teaching environment, we were keen to hear the thoughts of ETIC Algarve, ahead of this exciting collaboration. With a backdrop of the fantastic facilities available at the college, we asked the teaching staff about their decision to work with us, and DRC, in the classroom:Can you tell us a bit about your school/college, and the courses/services you offer to students?ETIC Algarve is a technical and vocational school, specializing in the creative industries Design, Photography, Video, Videogames, Web & Communication and of course Sound & Music. There is a strong emphasis on practice over theory inside a space of invention and restlessness where we promote the constant quest for discovery, where creativity and innovation go hand in hand. We promote a way of teaching based on real work practices, with real clients, real projects and real deadlines, all of them closely followed by our teachers who are professionals in the creative industries. We are training not only students, but more importantly our future co-workers.Can you tell us the reasons for choosing to include DRC as part of your teaching?Rafael Correia, one of ETIC Algarve’s trainers, covers this one: Firstly, because I use DRC in my personal projects and I like it. As a VST, it's very versatile and we [teachers] believe it's clear, useful and very quick to get some good results. And that's good for this kind of course.Which key features of DRC do you think will be especially useful to your students and really add value to their learning experience?The clear interface and easy access to the main functions; It has the main structure/architecture required to understand the basis of synthesis, but also [has the ability] to go further and get to unique places using DRC, almost intuitively. Waveforms, Oscillators, Noise, Modulation, Filter, Mixer, Portamento - we can easily use all these concepts to explain synthesis and the work of almost every VST, with a great interface.Which areas of study/which topics are you planning to teach using DRC?Analogic + Digital synthesis theory, Oscillators, Modulation, Poly/monophony, Glide, different kinds of filters, LFOs.How important is it for you to partner with customer focused companies like Imaginando?It's good to work with such good software, and a great team, in the same country! It works very well and gives the students a real close notion of this subject. The direct support from the company is very important, and shows how interested Imaginando are in this partnership with ETIC Algarve and our students, this gives us confidence and the feeling of being close to the product and its development.If you are an educational institution and you’d like to see how Imaginando could benefit your students, please get in touch and we will be happy to discuss how we could work together.From Portugal with passion,Team Imaginando...

How to make Trentemøller 'Prana' bass and stab sounds in DRC...

Published on 18 May 2018

Welcome to season 2 of our DRC Sound Design Tutorials series, where we resume our voyage of discovery through the sea of synthesis. Our first port of call is a track which takes the listener on a journey, with a variety of sections forming waypoints as the piece evolves. Captain of this week’s ship is Copenhagen based, Danish music producer ‘Trentemøller’ with the track ‘Prana’ from his 2006 debut album ‘The Last Resort’.In Hindu philosophy, ‘prana’ means ‘vital principle’ or ‘life force’, a spiritual interpretation and understanding of all cosmic energy in the entire universe. This influence is clear from the very start of the track, sitars paint a picture of sun and sand dunes, instantly invoking an Asian flavour. A bouncing bass soon breaks free of the trance like state and provides an injection of momentum to propel the piece forwards, pulling at the listeners curiosity, the journey begins.As increasingly interesting elements appear over the horizon and into our ears, the sitar leaves a slow trail of footprints in the sand, a continuous reminder of the path previously tread, which ultimately ends the same way that it started.Trentemøller’s musical talent was encouraged from an early age, starting with the piano at just 5 years old. At 11 he wrote the music for a school drama production, and by 14 was playing keyboards and drums in several indie, rock and blues bands. Just like DRC, he is a testament to versatility, which has led to remix work for the likes of Moby, Depeche Mode and Pet Shop Boys.Hopefully this new season of videos inspires you to take a creative journey of your own - be sure to let us know if it does!Click here to download the Ableton Live projectWe love great Danes,Team Imaginando...

How ETIC Algarve is using DRC in music production courses...

Published on 4 Apr 2018

We are proud to announce that we recently formed an educational partnership with a local creative industries technological college/school here in Portugal: ETIC Algarve.Enthusiastic to see DRC involved in a teaching environment, we were keen to hear the thoughts of ETIC Algarve, ahead of this exciting collaboration. With a backdrop of the fantastic facilities available at the college, we asked the teaching staff about their decision to work with us, and DRC, in the classroom:Can you tell us a bit about your school/college, and the courses/services you offer to students?ETIC Algarve is a technical and vocational school, specializing in the creative industries Design, Photography, Video, Videogames, Web & Communication and of course Sound & Music. There is a strong emphasis on practice over theory inside a space of invention and restlessness where we promote the constant quest for discovery, where creativity and innovation go hand in hand. We promote a way of teaching based on real work practices, with real clients, real projects and real deadlines, all of them closely followed by our teachers who are professionals in the creative industries. We are training not only students, but more importantly our future co-workers.Can you tell us the reasons for choosing to include DRC as part of your teaching?Rafael Correia, one of ETIC Algarve’s trainers, covers this one: Firstly, because I use DRC in my personal projects and I like it. As a VST, it's very versatile and we [teachers] believe it's clear, useful and very quick to get some good results. And that's good for this kind of course.Which key features of DRC do you think will be especially useful to your students and really add value to their learning experience?The clear interface and easy access to the main functions; It has the main structure/architecture required to understand the basis of synthesis, but also [has the ability] to go further and get to unique places using DRC, almost intuitively. Waveforms, Oscillators, Noise, Modulation, Filter, Mixer, Portamento - we can easily use all these concepts to explain synthesis and the work of almost every VST, with a great interface.Which areas of study/which topics are you planning to teach using DRC?Analogic + Digital synthesis theory, Oscillators, Modulation, Poly/monophony, Glide, different kinds of filters, LFOs.How important is it for you to partner with customer focused companies like Imaginando?It's good to work with such good software, and a great team, in the same country! It works very well and gives the students a real close notion of this subject. The direct support from the company is very important, and shows how interested Imaginando are in this partnership with ETIC Algarve and our students, this gives us confidence and the feeling of being close to the product and its development.If you are an educational institution and you’d like to see how Imaginando could benefit your students, please get in touch and we will be happy to discuss how we could work together.From Portugal with passion,Team Imaginando...

How to make Trentemøller 'Prana' bass and stab sounds in DRC...

Published on 18 May 2018

Welcome to season 2 of our DRC Sound Design Tutorials series, where we resume our voyage of discovery through the sea of synthesis. Our first port of call is a track which takes the listener on a journey, with a variety of sections forming waypoints as the piece evolves. Captain of this week’s ship is Copenhagen based, Danish music producer ‘Trentemøller’ with the track ‘Prana’ from his 2006 debut album ‘The Last Resort’.In Hindu philosophy, ‘prana’ means ‘vital principle’ or ‘life force’, a spiritual interpretation and understanding of all cosmic energy in the entire universe. This influence is clear from the very start of the track, sitars paint a picture of sun and sand dunes, instantly invoking an Asian flavour. A bouncing bass soon breaks free of the trance like state and provides an injection of momentum to propel the piece forwards, pulling at the listeners curiosity, the journey begins.As increasingly interesting elements appear over the horizon and into our ears, the sitar leaves a slow trail of footprints in the sand, a continuous reminder of the path previously tread, which ultimately ends the same way that it started.Trentemøller’s musical talent was encouraged from an early age, starting with the piano at just 5 years old. At 11 he wrote the music for a school drama production, and by 14 was playing keyboards and drums in several indie, rock and blues bands. Just like DRC, he is a testament to versatility, which has led to remix work for the likes of Moby, Depeche Mode and Pet Shop Boys.Hopefully this new season of videos inspires you to take a creative journey of your own - be sure to let us know if it does!Click here to download the Ableton Live projectWe love great Danes,Team Imaginando...