It feels longer than 5 years since New Zealand singer-songwriter Lorde first gave us her unique blend of indie/pop/electro (or whatever the Millenials call it these days!) when she was catapulted into the limelight in 2013 with her massive hit ‘Royals’. Amazingly she was just 16 at the time when it hit number 1 in the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, making her one of the youngest solo performers to do so. The previous artist/track to achieve this feat was back in 1987 when one-hit wonder Tiffany told us ‘I think we’re alone now’.

Thankfully Lorde’s music career hasn’t mirrored Tiffany’s, and the follow-up single to Royals was another one word song title, ‘Team’. The team in question being a tribute to her friends and the people of New Zealand, as she explains how it feels to live somewhat isolated and disconnected from popular music culture.

Lorde is no stranger to music production, after getting involved with the process on her debut album ‘Pure Heroine’, she is cited as co-producer for the entirety of her second LP in 2017 ‘Melodrama’. The other producer being Jack Antonoff, winner of multiple Grammy awards, his biggest production credit is working on Taylor Swift’s phenomenally popular album ‘1989’. It’s certainly a team that works though, as the album was a success with critics and fans alike.

This week we’re taking on the bass sound and the pad sound from Lorde’s ‘Team’ and showing you how to recreate them for yourself with DRC.

Click here to download the Ableton project file

We’ll never be royals,
Team Imaginando

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