Whilst some artists are content with purely having music be their artform, Vincent Belorgey is not one of them. If that name is unfamiliar to you, it’s because he is more commonly known as ‘Kavinsky.’ More than just a stage name, it’s a whole character, complete with a backstory carved out of the science fiction and zombie movies of the 80’s.

The influence of 80’s culture is recognisable in all of Kavinsky’s creative facets; the retro styling of the music videos, the oldskool action film narratives contained within, and of course the glorious sound of classic synthesizers creating an atmosphere of pure nostalgia.

The premise of the Kavinsky character’s history is certainly interesting; in 1986 he crashes his red Ferrari Testarossa, (the same car as the 80’s arcade racing game ‘Out Run’) he then reappears 20 years later as an electronic music creating zombie. Nightcall tells the story of Kavinsky’s quest to find his girlfriend at the time of the crash, only to discover that she has already moved on from him.

Originally released in 2010, the track received a boost of mainstream exposure and popularity after it was used in the opening sequence of the 2011 movie ‘Drive.’ In 2013, the English group ‘London Grammar’ took the song in a totally different direction, featuring haunting piano and vocals, their cover version almost feels like a completely different song.

If you haven’t already, be sure to check out our free effects plugin DLYM Delay Modulator that we used in this week’s video - it could be that extra little bit of sonic seasoning you are looking for!

Click here to download the Ableton project file

We’ll go all night long,
Team Imaginando

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How to make the bass, organ and steel drum sounds from Flume & Chet Faker 'Drop The Game' in DRC...

Published on 13 Jun 2019

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The secret behind every great double act is the way in which the two component parts work together, with successful compatibility achieved from either similarity or difference. Scottish duo The Proclaimers for example, have the biological advantage when it comes to similarity as they are twin brothers, so it’s no surprise their voices are homogeneously harmonious.There are far more examples of the second kind of partnerships though, where the contrast of the pair’s opposing attributes/flavours/tropes delivers a satisfying result. With our narrative established, let’s now look at how it applies to Austrailian collaborators Flume and Chet Faker, and their track ‘Drop The Game’.Harley Streten (Flume) and Nick Murphy (Chet Faker) first worked together in 2012 on ‘Left Alone’, a track from Flume’s self-titled debut album, before teaming up again in 2013 for the EP ‘Lockjaw’, which included ‘Drop The Game’. It’s easy to be swept away by Chet Faker’s soulful wandering vocals, just like the artist his pun-pleasing stage name pays homage to; jazz trumpeter Chet Baker. However, keeping things in line is Flume’s tight production, with punchy beats rhythmically slicing the mix into beat sized ear-fulls.Stripped back sections where your mind can float off into a daydream, are followed by a soberingly swift return back to earth, when the gravity of the percussive elements kicks back in. The catchy melody is punctuated with little rests, repetition keeps things moving but with a reluctant dragging of the heels.It’s another triple threat tutorial as we show you how to make the bass, organ and steel drum sounds for yourself with DRC.Click here to download the Ableton project fileWe’re dropping knowledge,Team Imaginando...